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May 10th, 2009
03:57 PM ET

Director’s Cut: Pretty in Pink

From CNN Senior Director Roger Strauss:

It’s 6 a.m. on Saturday and my alarm is blaring. Twelve hours from now, I will be at work directing Don Lemon’s shows, but right now I have to drag myself out of bed because I am participating in the Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure in downtown Atlanta. I am not alone. Fifty co-workers and their families are on the Turner Broadcasting/CNN team, and a record 15,000 of my pink-clad “closest friends” will join me, including one thousand breast cancer survivors.

One of those survivors is my wife, Eve Kofsky. Twice.

We all know someone who has had an encounter with breast cancer. In addition to my wife, I have friends who have had it at a young age. Even my uncle has had it. Yes, men can get breast cancer too. At the Race for the Cure, breast cancer survivors are in a special, pampered club. They get fed breakfast and get pink T-shirts and numbers, which signify that they are survivors. At the end of the race, they get pink roses, medals and every one of them is mentioned by name as he or she crosses a private finish line decorated in pink balloons.

Eve Kofsky, 2-Time Cancer Survivor

Eve Kofsky, 2-Time Cancer Survivor

It’s a club that makes you feel special on race day, but not necessarily a club you want to be a member of.

So as you celebrate Mother’s Day this year, take a moment to think about all of the brave people out there who are battling breast cancer or have survived it. The Atlanta walk raised over $1.5 million towards the fight against the disease. We can only hope that some day a cure will be found. Then I can go back to sleeping late every Saturday of the year.


Filed under: Don Lemon
soundoff (6 Responses)
  1. bonnie

    Way to go Roger! What a great way to start your day.

    May 10, 2009 at 7:09 pm |
  2. Boots

    This writer has a beautiful way with words. I also attended the breast cancer walk and it is so moving to see 15,000 people all in one place and doing the same thing to find the cure. See you next year at the walk!

    May 10, 2009 at 8:58 pm |
  3. janet

    why is it that the sponsors of this and other charities have cancer causing chemicals in them? Ironica eh? The EU doesn't allow those chemicals in those products into their countries.. so they adjust the ingredients for those countries and keep them the same in the US .. and we wonder why 1 in 2 men and 1 in 3 women get cancer. One hundred years ago, it was 1 in 500. Hmmmm. Check out natural news dot com. Check out Royal Rife, been curing cancer since the 1930s. And Ms. Budwig was a 7 time nobel prize nominee for curing cancer. Half the FDA's budget comes directly from Big Pharma? They do what they are told. While they want the masses to race for the cure. . or rather, the pills. . there are real cures available and have always been available...yet themainstream media doesn't cover it .. well look who sponsers their "program".. (the c ommercials is the money). Thetoxic world we live in (air, toxic water with fluoride, matresses that hae cancer causing chemicals in them, processed food, GMO, drugs from the cradle to the grave.. is it really any wonder why there is so much cancer .. consequences to our collective actions and inactions. Racing for the cure .. I mean the pill .. is not the answer. If you don't believe in God, I do understand your point of view. . man is superior. Butif you do, you have to stand back and look atthe big picture. There are other alternatives to mamograms that don't have the chance of if you keep doing it, you WILL find what you're looking for ..such as thermograms .. no swishing of the breasts (pain) and no radiation at all. But who's talking about that?? And when will news programs not be sponsored by big pharma too? Maybe then the information will change, not be sensored.

    May 10, 2009 at 11:20 pm |
  4. Braunsugar55

    Mother passed when I was 11yrs old. Everyyear for mother's day I would send my father a gift, until he pasted away about 10yrs ago. I have never found any one to replace him for mothers' day

    May 11, 2009 at 8:54 pm |
  5. Lois Stumpf

    Very nice tribute, Roger. I have walked the Susan Komen walk every year since 2004 except one (when we had too much out-of-town company to even think about the walk!) and am proud to be a survivor. It's a sisterhood that we'd rather not share but one we're proud to belong to because after all, we are surviving. Now we need a tandem ride for the cause!

    May 27, 2009 at 10:54 pm |
  6. Enrique Mora

    Dear Don,
    The current “Orange [Black Boxes]” are a thing of the past, a technology that was implemented decades ago and is terribly vulnerable and absolutely outdated.
    When David Warren invented such devices in the 60’s of the past Century, the Satellite Communication Technology that we have today was totally unknown.
    Triggered by the loss of Air France flight 447, I have come up with an idea that would revolutionize the flight security and information systems. This would be a Global Communication System which central would be installed in a safe place anywhere on the planet (Switzerland perhaps).
    All flights on air would be sending all their flight and audio signals (currently being recorded in the black box), to it, and even alarming conditions that may exist. This can be easily done via the wonderful satellite systems we already have in place at this time.
    If no incident or doubt, those recordings could be erased after 24 hours or so of uneventful landing.
    The amount of information recorded would be much smaller than that being handled by Twitter, Yahoo, or Google today. This recording system would resolve once and for all the dilemmas we are facing today about flight 447 and future similar cases.

    Thank you!

    June 6, 2009 at 7:09 pm |

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