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June 15th, 2009
12:05 AM ET

Beaten in Iran

Covering political unrest can be a dangerous assignment. CNN Senior International Producer Samson Desta was simply doing his job in Tehran, covering the presidential election. But the aftermath became volatile, and he was caught up in it. CNN's Don Lemon spoke to him about his experience.


Filed under: Don Lemon
soundoff (12 Responses)
  1. Sue

    We want Iran’s monarchy and real flag back, “Reza shah the second” is our king and a political leader of Iran.

    June 15, 2009 at 1:55 am |
  2. Darrell Hawaii

    We as Americans seem to find it so easy to point out the great injustices in Iran, etc. What about the 2002 Bush/Gore, Florida voter debacle? Wasn't that even more to rally against. We need to pay more attention to our own country and own actions before meddling in the rest of the world. I am very impressed by Iranians and their fearless protests. They need to resolve their differences in their own way.

    June 15, 2009 at 1:57 am |
  3. Payam Savar

    Just spoke to a relative in Iran and apparently the police swat teams that are attacking the people are not even Iranian. A group of protesters confronted them and they confirmed that they don't speak Farsi.

    June 15, 2009 at 1:58 am |
  4. heather enochs

    Firstly, yes, Moussavi does bear the burden of proof of whether or not the election is rigged. However, if their defense is that they had independent observers of the election process, "so how can it be rigged", then it does not hold water. Secondly, Who are the independent sources? or who volunteered? Money always talks, always. And rats on a sinking ship always abandon to safety, it is just self preservation and human nature. This is why i dont think that thier claim holds water. Thirdly, If Ahmadinejad is honest and won this election fairly, then why can't he guarantee the safety of his opponent. In the playbook of life, someone who plays dirty would leave his opponent to chance. Surely this precept transends cultural ethical boundries. Lastly, young Iranians are calling for help; "shots fired", chaos. Who, What, When, Where, Why, How? More importantly, who is truly going to heed their voice?

    June 15, 2009 at 2:24 am |
  5. kia

    Hey!I'm an Iranian and i live in Texas, I just wantedto thank you guys for covering this on the program. It really meens a lot to us. no other channel is covering it as real as you guys..thanks

    June 15, 2009 at 5:39 am |
  6. michael armstrong sr.

    its important that the world is kept up on world events these people who cover the news in these places of unrest are verry brave or incredibly stupid if the producers want to show there apreciation for there boldness then they need to honer them with medals and ribbons like the millitary does .

    June 15, 2009 at 10:02 am |
  7. Daniel Nelson

    I think it is about time that the Iranian people begin to take a stand against the Islamic radicals who rule the country. I also think that the Iranian government should be worried about the people instead of thinking that they are the most powerful nation because of their religious beliefs.God will hold them accountable for their funding of terrorists and causing unrest in the world! They should be more worried of what God might do to them because of the way they rule and their support of terrorism around the world!

    June 15, 2009 at 12:46 pm |
  8. Ali

    Please do not accept Ahmadi nejad as Iran's president, please please

    June 15, 2009 at 8:08 pm |
  9. Ali

    Hi,
    100% Ahmadi Nejad is not Iran's president, Please do not accept him as president, please, please.

    June 15, 2009 at 8:46 pm |
  10. Middle East Phoenix

    Iran, Where is my Vote? a deja vous of aUkrainian “orange revolution” with Iranian “green wave”

    Is it Iranian spring yet? Hundreds of thousands protestors swarmed streets of the Iranian capital Tehran this week in a political turmoil after tyrant Mahmoud Ahmadinejad was confirmed as the winner a questionable presidential election. It felt like a Da Ja Vou that reminded me with the 2005 Ukrainian “orange revolution” by Iranian “green wave”. I can almost feel “Wind of Change” over the Middle East after the recent changes in Lebanon with Saad Hariri and his 14 March pro-west bloc winning the Lebanese elections and now the attempts of change in Iran many voting for the moderate and reformist Hossein Mousavi.

    Many political analysts agreed that one main root problem of this region is manifested in the Iranian affairs and its nuclear problems. Being from the Middle East, I would argue that people in this region are tired of the current status of lack of freedom and want change. Iranians want Democracy. They want Prosperity. They want Freedom. The recent movements for change throughout the ascending street demonstrations in Iran is a great prove of this fact.

    Where is President Obama, the U.S. administration or the Western world from all of this? Why all this sudden silence after being so loud couple of weeks ago with a new message of hope to the Muslim world. One can claim that his speech maybe contributed and encouraged people to support the events that triggered the call for democracy in this region. So now, it’s our responsibility as international community has to step in NOW. The more they wait the more it allows time to the Iranian government to crush the well of the people. Everybody is looking back now at the White House waiting for a prove that President Obama can walk-the-walk after he proved couple of weeks ago that he can talk-the-talk. Can he step up for it?

    June 16, 2009 at 5:55 am |
  11. Ellery in Idaho

    They certainly need America to take down and overpower the Iranian President that i can't pronounce. They're going to need all the help they can get.

    June 17, 2009 at 10:48 am |
  12. Nasim

    I am an Iranian-American and I find it interesting that the people of Iran showed their unity and support for the Americans when 9/11 happened. They poured into the streets and marched eventhough their lives were at stake. Now that the Iranians need moral support, Americans are turning their heads. Do they not deserve moral support? Why is it that no Americans are joining all the Iranian people marching the streets in different cities around the U.S.? We can't sit back and expect president Obama to take action. He can't or won't for obvious reasons but the American people can. Iranians are just like you. We want freedom and our voices heard. We live amongst you. We are your neighbors, family members, doctors, and lawyers. Show your support. If this had happened in Africa or China, all the actors and activists would immediately react. Are Iranian lives not as valuable? Please show support.

    June 22, 2009 at 11:42 am |

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