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September 24th, 2009
06:42 PM ET

Metro Atlanta Flooding Pix

Some friends have sent their pictures of the flooding in and around Atlanta. We didn't get to use them on the air, so I thought I'd post them here as Kyra Blog Exclusives.

CNNer Dave J has a 25-mile commute home. It took a good bit longer than usual to get there Monday afternoon.

In his words:

First of many roads I encountered like this on my way home. Commute time: 2 hrs. 50 min.

Dave J
Dave J

 

My "commute" is only 2 miles or so; even so, there were unexpected obstacles. Monday after work, I turned the corner and splashed into one. Lucky my car's got good clearance!

Here's a pic my neighbor took, and sent to the AJC. (As of this morning, the tunnel was still impassable.)

Caroline Smith/ajc.com
Caroline Smith/ajc.com

 

[cnn-photo-caption image=http://i2.cdn.turner.com/cnn/2009/images/09/22/horses.flood.jpg caption="Kindra Warner"]
Today, I heard an old co-worker's house was flooded – no details yet on how bad it is.

Meantime, my friend Lily's been worrying about some of her pals too.

Here's her story:

Recently in Atlanta, flooding has had massive effects on all types of residents, including horses.

My name is Lily, I'm 11 years old, and I ride at Huntcliff Equestrian Center. Huntcliff received so much water it caused all horses to evacuate and move to Wills Park.

We don't know how long it will take to be able to go back to the barn, but at least all horses are safe.

The barn is bordered by the Chattahoochee River, and the water rose up so high that it flooded the pastures and stables. The water has never been that high. It passed something called “the 100 year mark”. The ponies and horses had no place to go, and had to be evacuated by emergency workers.

We don’t know how bad the damage is. I just hope we can get the horses back to their homes soon.

Lily
Roswell, GA

 

Kindra Warner
Kindra Warner

Kindra Warner
Kindra Warner

 


Filed under: Kyra Phillips • Weather
August 30th, 2009
11:58 AM ET

Weather Fuels California Fires

Four major fires are burning in southern and central California, forcing evacuations and threatening some 10,000 homes. Reynolds Wolf explains how the weather is making things tough for firefighters.

Join Reynolds Wolf, Betty Nguyen and TJ Holmes weekend mornings in the CNN Newsroom, beginning 6am ET/ 3am PT.

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Filed under: Clips from CNN Newsroom • Reynolds Wolf • Weather
August 11th, 2009
07:29 AM ET

Today's National Weather

Tropical Depression 2 formed on Tuesday morning in the far eastern tropical Atlantic with maximum sustained winds near 30 mph. The depression is located 280 miles west of the Cape Verde Islands. The depression is forecast to move west-northwestward and intensify to a tropical storm by early Wednesday morning. If it does so, it will become the first named storm of the 2009 Atlantic Hurricane Season – Ana.

Maximum sustained winds are forecast to reach 60 mph, just 14 mph short of becoming a Category 1 hurricane. The system should begin to slow in forward speed on Sunday northeast of the Leeward Islands. It is too early to tell if it will affect the U.S. mainland.

Tropical Storm Felicia is forecast to pass near Honolulu overnight tonight and weaken to a depression. Localized flash flooding and high surf will be possible until the center of the system moves west of the Islands.

New York City is under a heat advisory. Temperatures are expected to soar into the mid 90s later this afternoon.

Severe thunderstorms will fire along a cold front located in the Northeast and extending southwestward into the central Plains. A few storms may be severe, with gusty winds, dangerous lightning, and isolated flash flooding.


Filed under: In the Newsroom • Weather
August 10th, 2009
10:33 AM ET

Tropical Weather Update

TROPICAL STORM FELICIA
Tropical Storm Felicia is approaching the Hawaiian Islands and tropical storm watches have been posted for several of the islands from Oahu southeastward to Hawaii. Felicia is currently forecast to strike the island of Oahu on Tuesday evening around 8 p.m. local time (2 a.m. Eastern Daylight Saving Time). High surf and torrential rain is likely as the storm passes just to the north of Honolulu as a minimal tropical storm with sustained winds of 40 mph.

ATLANTIC TROPICAL UPDATE
A strong tropical wave in the far eastern Atlantic near the Cape Verde Islands diminished in intensity overnight. However, conditions are favorable for intensification and it could still become the second tropical depression of the 2009 Atlantic Hurricane Season. The wave is forecast to move west-northwestward over the next several days with little change in intensity.

Farther to the east, a strong tropical wave will be emerging off the west coast of Africa and models are developing this wave into a significant tropical cyclone as it moves off the African coast later this week.


Filed under: In the Newsroom • Weather
August 5th, 2009
08:46 AM ET

Today's National Weather

FLOODING IN LOUISVILLE, KY
Louisville officially received 4.53 inches of rain at the airport as strong thunderstorms moved slowly through the area yesterday, breaking the all-time one day record for August. The old record was 3.76 inches set on August 8, 1879. There’s only a slight chance of rain showers this afternoon as weak high pressure builds in behind a cool front.

SEVERE STORMS
There’s a slight risk of severe storms from the mid-Atlantic southwestward to the lower Mississippi River Valley today. Flash flooding, damaging thunderstorm winds, and dangerous cloud-to-ground lightning will be possible with the stronger storms.

Hurricane Felicia is churning westward in the eastern Pacific. Forecasters expect Felicia to become a major category 3 hurricane later today. The hurricane is forecast to weaken before potentially threatening the Hawaiian Islands as a tropical storm this weekend.
Hurricane Felicia is churning westward in the eastern Pacific. Forecasters expect Felicia to become a major category 3 hurricane later today. The hurricane is forecast to weaken before potentially threatening the Hawaiian Islands as a tropical storm this weekend.

Filed under: In the Newsroom • Weather
August 4th, 2009
08:27 AM ET

Today's National Weather

[cnn-photo-caption image=http://i2.cdn.turner.com/cnn/2009/images/08/04/tropics_dotcom.jpg caption="An area of disturbed weather several hundred miles southwest of the Cape Verde Islands is showing some signs of development this morning and could become the first named storm of the 2009 Atlantic Hurricane Season."]

SEVERE STORMS
Severe storms are moving through the Midwest this morning and the threat of severe weather will continue through the day. Strong storms will be capable of producing dangerous flash flooding, damaging winds, hail and a few isolated tornadoes.

HEAT ACROSS THE PLAINS AND SOUTHWEST
Heat advisories are in effect for northeastern Oklahoma today (including the Tulsa metro area, which is under an excessive heat warning). Temperatures will continue to be hot in Phoenix, with highs around 111 this afternoon. Phoenix is also under an excessive heat warning. There’s no relief in sight for the Southwest.

THE TROPICS
We are watching an area of disturbed weather several hundred miles southwest of the Cape Verde Islands. Global forecast models are showing some potential for slow development of this area over the next few days. Even if this area does develop into a tropical cyclone, the models show it curving away from the U.S. mainland.


Filed under: In the Newsroom • Weather
August 3rd, 2009
08:21 AM ET

Today's National Weather

SEVERE STORMS
There’s a slight risk of isolated severe storms in the Missouri River Valley and the upper-Mississippi River Valley today. The primary threat from these storms will be damaging straight-line winds and very large hail. An isolated tornado can’t be ruled out.

There’s also a slight risk of severe storms over southwestern Oregon today. The primary threat from the stronger storms will be damaging straight-line winds.

EXCESSIVE HEAT
The Pacific Northwest cooled down over the weekend but temperatures are still running about 10 to 15 degrees above normal in Portland and Seattle. Record setting heat is not expected this week. However, temperatures will continue to be above normal through Friday.

An excessive heat warning has been issued for Phoenix. The daytime highs are expected to climb to 109 to 112 degrees this afternoon and tomorrow, with temperatures only falling to around 90 degrees overnight.

Excessive heat watches are in effect for Tulsa, where heat indices are expected to climb above 100 starting tomorrow and continuing through Thursday.


Filed under: In the Newsroom • Weather
July 31st, 2009
09:39 AM ET

Today's National Weather

PACIFIC RECORD HEAT ENDS TODAY
Seattle recorded a record high temperature for the day of 96 degrees at the airport and 100 degrees at the National Weather Service Forecast Office yesterday afternoon. Temperatures will still run about 10-15 degrees above normal in interior northwestern Oregon and western Washington. Temperatures will begin to moderate this weekend as onshore flow from the cool Pacific waters becomes stronger. An air quality alert is in effect for the Seattle Metropolitan Area today.

SEVERE STORMS
Severe thunderstorms will be possible along the eastern seaboard. There’s a slight risk of severe storms in Boston, NYC, the Nation’s capital and southwestward into the Atlanta metro area. The greatest threat from these storms will be urban flooding, flash flooding, dangerous lightning, and gusty winds. An isolated tornado can’t be ruled out across the Northeast, but chances are less than 2 percent.

THE WEEKEND
Wet weather will continue across the Southeast as a series of weak frontal boundaries interact with rich tropical moisture from the Gulf. Strong thunderstorms are expected each day. Flash flooding and dangerous lightning, along with gusty winds will accompany the stronger storms. Temperatures will be unseasonably cool across the northern tier states with overnight temperatures dropping into the upper 30s and low 40s. Record low temperatures will be possible in Montana and North Dakota.

If you see severe weather, send photos and/or videos to ireport.com. You can also send tweets to cnnweather.

An extreme weather pattern will set up across the Nation this weekend with cold temperatures across the northern tier states, torrential rain along the Eastern Seaboard and hot and dry conditions in the West.
An extreme weather pattern will set up across the Nation this weekend with cold temperatures across the northern tier states, torrential rain along the Eastern Seaboard and hot and dry conditions in the West.

Filed under: In the Newsroom • Weather
July 17th, 2009
05:15 PM ET

Sand Storms Across Middle East

Photo credit: YASSER AL-ZAYYAT/AFP/Getty Images

Approaching sandstorm over Kuwait City on May 14, 2009. Photo credit: YASSER AL-ZAYYAT/AFP/Getty Images

by Bonnie Schneider
CNN Severe Weather Team

In recent weeks huge incessant sand storms have disrupted life across the Middle East. These massive storms shut down the city of Tehran, Iran for days, and caused U.S. Vice President Joe Biden to cancel a trip to Kurdistan while he was in Iraq recently.

According to Multi-national Corps-Iraq Technical Sgt. John Lawless, who works in the staff weather office, the sand storms in the region are getting worse.

"The last two years appear to have more numerous dust storms of longer duration…it is also likely that the drought has made more dust available in ...Iraq and Syria"

In this part of the world the wind that carries the dust and sand is called a "Shemal". This northwesterly wind blows from Western Syria into Iraq and can carry the dust for many miles. The topography of Iraq plays a role as to why the storms grow in size and intensity.

"NW Iraq to SE Iraq is a valley region...as the dust gets picked up in Syria it gets funneled into this valley area...it has less of a chance to disperse...this helps to make the dust denser." Sgt. Lawless told CNN.

The health effects from these tall, sand clouds are enormous. Dr. Lisa Zacher is the Pulmonary Medical Consultant to the Unites States Army Surgeon General. She treated patients with sand storm related injuries in Texas and Iraq.

"Even persons without pre-existing lung disease can suffer from irritation if the nose, throat, and lungs. ...Eye injuries can range from simple irritation to corneal abrasions...Chronic exposure can lead to the development of respiratory illnesses..." She told CNN.

If you are ever caught in a sand storm, Dr. Zacher advised: "Seek shelter. Protect eyes, nose and mouth (even with a sleeve or t-shirt). If you are driving, pull over to the side of the road. Stay well hydrated so that you can continue to have an effective cough."

In Iraq, typically sand storms start to decrease in frequency towards the end to the summer. But these violent blasts of nature can happen anytime, year-round.


Filed under: In the Newsroom • Weather
July 16th, 2009
08:53 AM ET

Today's National Weather

PLAINS SIZZLE FIZZLES

Afternoon high temperatures will drop by almost 20 degrees in portions of the central and southern Plains by Saturday. Triple digit temperatures in Oklahoma City, Dallas and Tulsa will give way to afternoon highs in the low- to mid-80s this weekend.

There’s a slight risk of severe storms along a cold front extending from the mid-Mississippi River Valley westward into the central and southern Plains. Damaging thunderstorm wind gusts and large hail will accompany the stronger storms and an isolated tornado or two can’t be ruled out.

The tropics are quiet in the Atlantic. However, the eastern Pacific Basin is active with two named tropical cyclones – Tropical depression Carlos and Tropical Storm Dolores. Both storms are not expected to threaten land and will remain in the open waters of the Pacific until they dissipate.

If you see severe weather, send photos and/or videos to ireport.com. You can also send tweets to cnnweather.

Today's national weather forecast from the CNN Severe Weather Center.
Today's national weather forecast from the CNN Severe Weather Center.

Filed under: In the Newsroom • Weather
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